Development News

Progress on the Salesforce Suite for D8 and a Call for Participation

Drupal News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 15:21

The following blog was written by Drupal Association Premium Supporting Partner, Message Agency.

After months of work, hundreds of commits, and lots of new thinking, the Salesforce Suite for Drupal 8 is reaching maturity.  There is tremendous interest in these modules, and many enterprises are waiting for this milestone to integrate D8 sites with Salesforce. In an effort to accelerate refinement and adoption of this important contribution, the module’s developers are raising awareness about the release and asking the community to start downloading and contributing.

A few months ago at Drupalcon Baltimore, Message Agency announced a release candidate (8.x-3.0-rc1) for the Salesforce Suite in Drupal 8.  This collection of modules supports integration with Salesforce by mapping Drupal entities with standard or custom Salesforce objects and pushing Drupal data to Salesforce as well as pulling Salesforce data into Drupal.

Since then, we've continued to expand the Suite and build out critical features. We've also continued to groom the 8.x roadmap, solicit community participation through webinars, and build awareness about how to use the modules. With a solid foundation and full functionality, the Suite is beginning to gain traction and see increasing adoption as projects switch to Drupal 8.

What’s new in the Suite?

The modules are a complete rewrite of the Suite for Drupal 8, and they fully leverage Drupal core’s object-oriented code patterns.  Message Agency’s senior software engineer, Aaron Bauman, was the original architect of the Suite for 6.x in 2009 and has continued to support this important tool ever since. He took the lead in porting the modules for Drupal 8, based on feedback from the community, clients, and nearly a decade of experience integrating these two powerful platforms.

There is much to be excited about in this new version. There have been a number of updates from Drupal 7.x:

  • Queue on failure. There is now an attempt to push synchronization immediately on entity save and enqueue for asynchronous push only on failure. This feature idea is a great compromise between the previous binary sync/async decision point.
  • Test coverage.  Testing 3rd-party web services can be tricky, and requires careful planning and mocking. This Salesforce 8.x release includes test coverage for push and pull operations using mock REST features, allowing for proper regression testing and test-driven development.
  • Push queue overhaul, and cron-based push.  Drupal 7's asynchronous push left a lot to be desired. Lack of error handling made debugging and troubleshooting difficult to impossible. Lack of optimizations burned unnecessary API calls. Both of these limitations were imposed by Drupal Queue API's fundamental nature. In Drupal 7, our options for extending the Queue system were limited. In Drupal 8, we've implemented a Salesforce Push Queue service, building on Drupal core's overhauled Queue API. We've taken the opportunity to normalize queue items, optimize queue operations, and implement error handling and recovery.
  • Objectification of Salesforce resources. Moving in the direction of a proper REST PHP SDK, we now have proper classes for Query Result, SObject, Salesforce ID, various REST Responses, and others. This not only allows for simple type-hinting across other classes, but also gives developers consistent and reliable interfaces, and paves the way for even greater extensibility in the future.
  • Queue settings per mapping. The Suite now allows administrators to assign sync intervals per-mapping, instead of running all sync operations on every cron run. This feature idea will allow administrators to tweak their synchronizations according to business needs, without the need to implement extensive hook-based logic.

Several new features for Drupal 8 also have been developed:

  • Goodbye hooks, hello events.  Leveraging Salesforce.api.php, we mapped old hooks onto new events—a key advantage for folks already familiar with the 7.x version.
  • A new plugin system for mapping fields.  There has been a mapping UI overhaul.  Salesforce Mapping Fields now enjoy their own plugin system, allowing for maximum extensibility. For example, "Record Type" is now its own mapping field plugin type, rather than receiving special treatment in the push and pull systems.
  • Pluggable everything. including the REST Client itself, thanks to Drupal services and Dependency Injection.  
  • Examples module.  There is now a working examples module with an event subscriber, exported mapping config, and demonstration of using the  REST client to connect to an Apex endpoint.

The new version also builds in some important re-includes from 7.x - 2.x branch.

  • Mapped Objects are tied to Mappings
  • Custom push queue
  • Re-attempt on failure
  • Encryption support
What is the current status? And how can you help?

The Suite has advanced to 8.x-3.0-rc6 and is nearing a stable release.  It’s time to start downloading and using the modules to help us identify and smooth out the rough spots.

For a quick start overview, watch this Acquia webinar, delivered by Aaron Bauman on how to install and configure the Suite.

https://youtu.be/9tKrpxW1sMk https://www.acquia.com/resources/webinars/how-use-salesforce-suite-drupal-8-quick-start-guide?r=735547932

Keep those issues coming in the queue!

The Heavy Lifting

This amount of work is never done alone.  By the numbers, so far:

  • 5 contributors including 2 Message Agency staff.  (Shout out to evanjenkins, bezhermoso, and gcb for their contributions.)
  • Merged 7 major branches.
  • More than 200 commits.
  • Nearly 400 hours logged across 5 Message Agency dev and PM staff, and 3 drupal.org users

Also, major thanks to Acquia's Drupal 8 Module Acceleration Program for connecting us with clients to fund and advance module development.

Categories: Development News, Drupal

An update on projects created for Drupal

Drupal News - Sat, 10/07/2017 - 03:00

About six months ago we made a significant change to the way that modules, themes, and distributions are created on Drupal.org.

In the past, contributors had to first create a sandbox project, and then request manual review of their project in the Project Applications issue queue. The benefit of this community-driven moderation process was that modules were vetted for code quality and security issues by a group of volunteers. Project maintainers who completed this process also received the benefit of security advisory coverage from the Security Team for stable releases of their projects.

Unfortunately, the rate of project applications outpaced what volunteers could keep up with, and many worthy projects were never promoted to full project status, or moved off of Drupal.org to be hosted elsewhere.

To ameliorate this issue, we changed the process so that any confirmed user on Drupal.org may now make full projects.

To mitigate the risks of low code quality or security vulnerabilities we added new signals to project pages: including highlighting which release is recommended by the maintainer, displaying recent test results, and indicating whether the project receives security coverage both on the project page and in the composer 'extra' attribute. We're continuing to work on identifying additional signals of project quality that we can include, as well as surfacing some of this information in Drupal core. We also converted the project applications issue queue into a 'request security advisory coverage' issue queue.

What we hoped to see

We knew this would be a significant change for the project and the community. While many community members were excited to see the gates to contribution opened, others were concerned about security issues and Drupal's reputation for code quality.

Our prediction was that the lower barrier to contribution would result in an increase in full projects created on Drupal.org. This would indicate that new contributors or third party technology providers were finding it easier to integrate with Drupal and contribute those integrations back for use by others.

At the same time, we also expected to see an increase in the number of full projects that do not receive coverage from the security team. The question was whether this increase would be within an acceptable range, or represent a flood of low quality or insecure modules.

The results

The table below provides statistics about the full projects created on Drupal.org in the 5 months before March 17th, 2017 - when we opened the creation of full projects to all confirmed users.

Full projects created from 2016-10-16 to 2017-03-17…

#

% of projects created in this period

… without stable release

431

55.76%

… with stable releases

342

44.24%

… with usage >= 50 sites

237

30.66%

… with usage >= 50 sites and without stable release

68

8.80%

… with usage >= 50 sites and with stable release

169

21.86%

… with an open security coverage application*

18

2.33%

Sub-total with security coverage

342

44.24%

Sub-total without security coverage

431

55.76%

Sub-total with security coverage and >=50 usage

169

21.86%

Sub-total without security coverage and >= 50 usage

68

8.80%

Total

773

* note: full projects that did not have stable releases were not automatically opted in to security coverage when we opened the full project creation gates.

… and this table provides statistics about the projects created in the 5 months after we opened the creation of full projects to all confirmed users:

Full projects created from 2017-03-17 to 2017-08-16…

#

Diff

% of projects created

Diff %

… without stable release

851

+420

69.53%

+97%

… with stable releases

373

+31

30.47%

+9%

… with usage >= 50 sites

156

-81

12.75%

-34%

… with usage >= 50 sites and without stable release

64

-4

5.23%

-6%

… with usage >= 50 sites and with stable release

92

-77

7.52%

+46%

… with an open security coverage application

62

+44

5.07%

+344%

Sub-total with security coverage

182

-160

14.87%

-53%

Sub-total without security coverage

1,042

+611

85.13%

+242%

Sub-total with security coverage and >=50 usage

54

-115

4.41%

-32%

Sub-total without security coverage and >= 50 usage

102

+34

8.33%

+150%

Total

1,224

+451

+58%

As you can see, we have an almost 58% increase in the rate of full projects created on Drupal.org. We can also see a significant proportional increase in two key areas: projects with greater than 50 site usage and no security coverage(up 150% compared to the previous period), and projects that have applied for security coverage(up 344% compared to the previous period). Note: this increase in applications is for projects *created in these date ranges* not necessarily applications created overall.

This tells us that reducing friction in applying for security coverage, and encouraging project maintainers to do so should be a top priority.

Finally, this last table gives statistics about all of the projects currently on Drupal.org, regardless of creation date:

Full projects (7.x and 8.x)

#

% of Total

Rate of change after 2017-03-17

… with the ability to opt into security coverage

8,718

36.15%

-1.33%

… with security coverage and stable releases

8,377

34.74%

-1.49%

… without security coverage

15,396

63.85%

+1.33%

… without security coverage and with stable releases

464

1.92%

+1.04%

… with security coverage and >=50 usage
 

6,475

66.91 / 26.85%

-0.54%

… with security coverage and stable releases and >=50 usage

6,308

65.19 /26.16%

-0.65%

… without security coverage and >=50 usage

3,202

33.09 /13.28%

+0.54%

… without security coverage and with stable releases and >=50 usage

130

1.34 /0.54%

+0.51%

Sub-total with >=50 usage

9,677

40.13%

-1.72%

Total

24,114

From the overall data we see approximately what we might expect. The increase in growth of full projects on Drupal.org has lead to a modest increase in projects without security coverage.

Before the project application change, all full projects with stable releases received security advisory coverage. After this change, only those projects that apply for the ability to opt in(and then do so) receive coverage.

What has this meant for security coverage of projects hosted on Drupal.org?

1.92% of all full 7.x and 8.x projects have stable releases, but do not receive security advisory coverage. It is likely no accident that this translates into 464 projects, which is nearly equivalent to the number of projects additional projects added compared to our old growth rate.

Of those only 130 of those projects report more than 50 sites usage(or .54% of all 7.x and 8x full projects).

Next steps

From this analysis we can conclude the following:

  1. The opening of the project application gates has dramatically increased the number of projects contributed to Drupal.org.

  2. It has also increased the number of projects without security coverage, and the number of applications for the ability to opt in to coverage among new projects.

In consultation with the Security Working Group, we recommend the following:

  • For now, leave the project creation projects as it stands today - open to contribution from any confirmed user on Drupal.org.

    • Less than 2% of all Drupal projects with stable releases currently lack security coverage. The rate at which this is increasing is significant (and in the wrong direction) but not rapid enough to merit changing the project application policy immediately.

  • Solve the problem of too many security advisory coverage applications. The security advisory application queue has the same problem that the old project applications queue had - not enough volunteers to manually vet all of the applications - and therefore a significant backlog of project maintainers waiting on the ability to opt into coverage.

    • Recommendation: Implement an automated best practices quiz that maintainers can take in order to be granted the ability to opt into security advisory coverage. If this process is as successful as we hope, we may want to consider making this a gate on stable releases for full projects as well.

We look forward to working with the Security Working Group to implement this recommendation and continue to improve the contribution experience on Drupal.org, while preserving code quality and security.

Categories: Development News, Drupal

Drupal 8.4.0 is now available

Drupal News - Wed, 10/04/2017 - 16:20
What's new in Drupal 8.4.0?

This new version is an important milestone of stability for Drupal 8. It adds under-the-hood improvements to enable stable releases of key contributed modules for layouts, media, and calendaring. Many other core experimental modules have also become stable in this release, including modules for displaying form errors inline and managing workflows.

The release includes several very important fixes for content revision data integrity as well as an update to stop the deletion of orphaned files that was causing data loss for many sites, alongside numerous improvements for site builders and content authors.

Download Drupal 8.4.0

Important: If you use Drush to manage Drupal, be sure to update to Drush 8.1.12 or higher before updating Drupal. Updating to Drupal 8.4.0 using Drush 8.1.11 or earlier will fail. (Always test minor version updates carefully before making them live.)

Inline Form Errors

The Inline Form Errors module provides a summary of any validation errors at the top of a form and places the individual error messages next to the form elements themselves. This helps users understand which entries need to be fixed, and how. Inline Form Errors was provided as an experimental module from Drupal 8.0.0 on, but it is now stable and polished enough for production use.

Screenshot showing form error displayed with the field rather than at the top of the form.

Datetime Range

The Datetime Range module provides a field type that allows end dates to support contributed modules like Calendar. This stable release is backwards-compatible with the Drupal 8.3.x experimental version and shares a consistent API with other Datetime fields. Future releases may improve Views support, usability, Datetime Range field validation, and REST support.

Screenshot showing form elements to specify start and end dates.

Layout Discovery API

The Layout Discovery module provides an API for modules or themes to register layouts as well as five common layouts. Providing this API in core enables core and contributed layout solutions like Panels and Display Suite to be compatible with each other. This stable release is backwards-compatible with the 8.3.x experimental version and introduces support for per-region attributes.

Media API

The new core Media module provides an API for reusable media entities and references. It is based on the contributed Media Entity module.

Since there is a rich ecosystem of Drupal contributed modules built on Media Entity, the top priority for this release is to provide a stable core API and data model for a smoother transition for these modules. Developers and expert site builders can now add Media as a dependency. Work is underway to provide an update path for existing sites' Media Entity data and to port existing contributed modules to the refined core API.

Note that the core Media module is currently marked hidden and will not appear on the 'Extend' (module administration) page. (Enabling a contributed module that depends on the core Media module will also enable Media automatically.) The module will be displayed to site builders normally once once related user experience issues are resolved in a future release.

Similarly, the REST API and normalizations for Media are not final and support for decoupled applications will be improved in a future release.

Content authoring and site administration experience improvements

The "Save and keep (un)published" dropbutton has been replaced with a "Published" checkbox and single "Save" button. The "Save and..." dropbutton was a new design in Drupal 8, but users found it confusing, so we have restored a design that is more similar to the user interface for Drupal 7 and earlier.

Both the "Comments" administration page at `/admin/content/comment` and the "Recent log messages" report provided by dblog are now configurable views. This allows site builders to easily customize, replace or clone these screens.

Updated migrations

This release adds date and node reference support for Drupal 6 to Drupal 8 migrations. Core provides migrations for most Drupal 6 data and can be used for migrating Drupal 6 sites to Drupal 8, and the Drupal 6 to 8 migration path is nearing beta stability. Some gaps remain, such as for some internationalization data. The Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 migration is incomplete but is suitable for developers who would like to help improve the migration and can be used to test upgrades especially for simple Drupal 7 sites. Most high-priority migrations are available.

Moderation and workflows

The Workflows module is now also stable, however it only provides a framework for managing workflows and is not directly useful in itself. The experimental Content Moderation module allows workflows to be applied to content and is now at beta stability. Content moderation workflows can now apply to any entity types that support revisions, and numerous usability issues and critical bugs are resolved in this release.

Platform features for web services

Drupal 8.4 continues to expand Drupal's support for web services that benefit decoupled sites and applications, including a 15% performance improvement for authenticated REST requests, expanded REST functionality, and developer-facing improvements.

Further details are available about each area in the 8.4.0 release notes.

What does this mean for me? Drupal 8 site owners

Update to 8.4.0 to continue receiving bug and security fixes. The next bugfix release (8.4.1) is scheduled for November 1, 2017.

Updating your site from 8.3.7 to 8.4.0 with update.php is exactly the same as updating from 8.3.6 to 8.3.7. If you use Drush, be sure to update to Drush 8.1.12 or higher before using it to update Drupal 8.3.7 to 8.4.0. Drupal 8.4.0 also has major updates to several dependencies, including Symfony, jQuery, and jQuery UI. Modules, themes, and translations may need updates for these and other changes in this minor release, so test the update carefully before updating your production site.

Drupal 7 site owners

Drupal 7 is still fully supported and will continue to receive bug and security fixes throughout all minor releases of Drupal 8.

Most high-priority migrations from Drupal 7 to 8 are now available, but the migration path is still not complete, especially for multilingual sites, so you may encounter errors or missing migrations when you try to migrate. That said, since your Drupal 7 site can remain up and running while you test migrating into a new Drupal 8 site, you can help us stabilize the Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 migration path! Testing and bug reports from your real-world Drupal 7 sites will help us stabilize this functionality sooner for everyone. (Search the known issues.)

Drupal 6 site owners

Drupal 6 is not supported anymore. Create a Drupal 8 site and try migrating your data into it as soon as possible. Your Drupal 6 site can still remain up and running while you test migrating your Drupal 6 data into your new Drupal 8 site. Core now provides migrations for most Drupal 6 data, but the migrations of multilingual functionality in particular are not complete. If you find a new bug not covered by the known issues with the experimental Migrate module suite, your detailed bug report with steps to reproduce is a big help!

Translation, module, and theme contributors

Minor releases like Drupal 8.4.0 include backwards-compatible API additions for developers as well as new features. Read the 8.4.0 release notes for more details on the improvements for developers in this release.

Since minor releases are backwards-compatible, modules, themes, and translations that supported Drupal 8.3.x and earlier will be compatible with 8.4.x as well. However, the new version does include some changes to strings, user interfaces, and internal APIs (as well as more significant changes to experimental modules). This means that some small updates may be required for your translations, modules, and themes. See the announcement of the 8.4.0 release candidate for more background information.

Categories: Development News, Drupal

PHP 7.1.10 Release Announcement

PHP Announcements - Fri, 09/29/2017 - 04:10
The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.1.10. This is a bugfix release, with several bug fixes included. All PHP 7.1 users are encouraged to upgrade to this version. For source downloads of PHP 7.1.10 please visit our downloads page, Windows source and binaries can be found on windows.php.net/download/. The list of changes is recorded in the ChangeLog.
Categories: Development News, PHP, PHP News

PHP 7.2.0 Release Candidate 3 Released

PHP Announcements - Thu, 09/28/2017 - 06:58
The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.2.0 RC3. This release is the third Release Candidate for 7.2.0. All users of PHP are encouraged to test this version carefully, and report any bugs and incompatibilities in the bug tracking system. THIS IS A DEVELOPMENT PREVIEW - DO NOT USE IT IN PRODUCTION! For more information on the new features and other changes, you can read the NEWS file, or the UPGRADING file for a complete list of upgrading notes. These files can also be found in the release archive. For source downloads of PHP 7.2.0 Release Candidate 3 please visit the download page, Windows sources and binaries can be found at windows.php.net/qa/. The next Release Candidate will be announced on the 12th of October. You can also read the full list of planned releases on our wiki. Thank you for helping us make PHP better.
Categories: Development News, PHP, PHP News

State of Drupal presentation (September 2017)

Drupal News - Wed, 09/27/2017 - 10:33

This blog has been re-posted with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Group photo

Yesterday, I shared my State of Drupal presentation at DrupalCon Vienna. In addition to sharing my slides, I wanted to provide some more detail on how Drupal is evolving, who Drupal is for, and what I believe we should focus on.

Drupal is growing and changing

I started my keynote by explaining that Drupal is growing. Over the past year, we've witnessed a rise in community engagement, which has strengthened Drupal 8 adoption.

This is supported by the 2017 Drupal Business Survey; after surveying 239 executives from Drupal agencies, we can see that Drupal 8 has become the defacto release for them and that most of the Drupal businesses report to be growing.

Drupal 8 Agency Adoption

Drupal Agency Growth

While the transition from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 is not complete, Drupal 8's innovation continues to accelerate. We've seen the contributed modules ecosystem mature; in the past year, the number of stable modules has more than doubled. Additionally, there are over 4,000 modules in development.

Drupal 8 module readiness

In addition to growth, both the vendor and technology landscapes around Drupal are changing. In my keynote, I noted three primary shifts in the vendor landscape. Single blogs, portfolio sites and brochure sites, which represent the low end of the market, are best served by SaaS tools. On the other side of the spectrum, a majority of enterprise vendors are moving beyond content management into larger marketing suites. Finally, the headless CMS market segment is growing rapidly, with some vendors growing at a rate of 500% year over year.

There are also significant changes in the technology landscape surrounding Drupal, as a rising number of Drupal agencies have also started using modern JavaScript technologies. For example, more than 50% of Drupal agencies are also using Node.js to support the needs of their customers.

Changing technology stack

While evolving vendor and technology landscapes present many opportunities for Drupal, it can also introduce uncertainty. After listening to many people in the Drupal community, it's clear that all these market and technology trends, combined with the long development and adoption cycle of Drupal 8, has left some wondering what this all means for Drupal, and by extension also for them.

Drupal is no longer for simple sites

Over the past year, I've explained why I believe Drupal is for ambitious digital experiences, in both my DrupalCon Baltimore keynote and on my blog. However, I think it would be valuable to provide more detail on what I mean by "ambitious digital experiences". It's important that we all understand who Drupal is for, because it drives our strategy, which in turn allows us to focus our efforts.

Today, I believe that Drupal is no longer for simple sites. Instead, Drupal's sweetspot is sites or digital experiences that require a certain level of customization or flexibility — something I refer to as "richness".

Who is Drupal for?

Ambitious is much more than just enterprise

This distinction is important because I often find that the term "ambitious" becomes conflated with "enterprise". While I agree that Drupal is a great fit for the enterprise, I personally never loved that categorization. It's not just large organizations that use Drupal. Individuals, small startups, universities, museums and nonprofits can be equally ambitious in what they'd like to accomplish and Drupal can be an incredible solution for them.

An example of this could be a small business that manages 50 rental properties. While they don't have a lot of traffic (reach), they require integrations with an e-commerce system, a booking system, and a customer support tool to support their business. Their allotted budget is $50,000 or less. This company would not be considered an enterprise business; however, Drupal would be a great fit for this use case. In many ways, the "non-enterprise ambitious digital experiences" represent the majority of the Drupal ecosystem. As I made clear in my presentation, we don't want to leave those behind.

Drupal is for ambitious digital experiences

Addressing the needs of smaller organizations

The Drupal ecosystem majority are organizations with sites that require medium-to-high richness, which SaaS builders cannot support. However, they also don't need to scale at the level of enterprise companies. As the Drupal community continues to consider how we can best support this majority, a lot of smaller Drupal agencies and end-users have pointed out that they would benefit from the following two things:

  1. Powerful site building tools. They want easy-to-use site building tools that are simple to learn, and don't require dozens of contributed modules to be installed and configured. They would also prefer to avoid writing a lot of custom code because their clients have smaller budgets. Great examples of tools that would improve site building are Drupal's upcoming layout builder, workspaces and media library. To make some of Drupal's own administrative UIs more powerful and easier to use, I proposed that we add a modern JavaScript to core.
  2. Easier updates and maintenance. While each Drupal 8 site benefits from continuous innovation, it also needs to be updated more often. The new Drupal 8 release cycle has monthly patch releases and 6-month minor releases. In addition, organizations have to juggle ad-hoc updates from contributed modules. In addition, site updates has often become more complex because our dependency on third-party libraries and because not everyone can use Composer. Many smaller users and agencies would benefit tremendously from auto-updates because maintaining and updating their Drupal 8 sites can be too manual, too complex and too expensive.

The good news is that we have made progress in both improving site builder tools and simplifying updates and maintenance. Keep an eye on future blog posts about these topics. In the meantime, you can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 22:10), or you can download a copy of my slides (56 MB).

Categories: Development News, Drupal

Drupal 6.12

Drupal 6.x Upgrade Project - Thu, 05/14/2009 - 13:07

Drupal 6.12 and 5.18, maintenance releases fixing problems reported using the bug tracking system, as well as a critical security vulnerability, are now available for download. Drupal 6.12 also fixes "account page opens automatically after login" among other smaller issues.

Upgrading your existing Drupal 5 and 6 sites is strongly recommended.

For more info see Drupal 6.12 and 5.18 released, SA-CORE-2009-006 - Drupal core - Cross site scripting and Upgrade Drupal to 6.12.

read more

Drupal 6.11

Drupal 6.x Upgrade Project - Wed, 04/29/2009 - 21:03

Drupal 6.11 and 5.17, maintenance releases fixing problems reported using the bug tracking system, as well as a critical security vulnerability, are now available for download. Drupal 6.11 also fixes performance issues with the menu cache and update status cache among other smaller issues.

Upgrading your existing Drupal 5 and 6 sites is strongly recommended.

For more info see Drupal 6.11 and 5.17 released, SA-CORE-2009-005 - Drupal core - Cross site scripting and Upgrade Drupal to 6.11.

read more

BobbyMods Drupal 6.x Upgrade Project

Drupal 6.x Upgrade Project - Tue, 02/24/2009 - 14:32

Here you can find all 'loose' Drupal 6.x core upgrade projects.

If your project is maintained by BobbyMods.com then your upgrade will be found at your project.

This project is only for CORE upgrades that do not fall within a regular project.
If you need to also update modules and themes (or the need to do so arises during the update), that will be a separate project.

Pending

Drupal 6.x Upgrade Project - Tue, 02/24/2009 - 14:32
TitleIssue StatusPriorityCategoryVersionComponentChanged

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